More Work Needed Is Directed By The United States (U.S.) Federal Aviation Administration (F.A.A.) Director & Chief Steven “Steve” Dickson, A Former U.S. Delta Airlines Captain, After Test Flying The Globally Grounded Boeing 737 MAX; In A Remarkable Move.

More Work Needed Is Directed By The United States (U.S.) Federal Aviation Administration (F.A.A.) Director & Chief Steven “Steve” Dickson, A Former U.S. Delta Airlines Captain, After Test Flying The Globally Grounded Boeing 737 MAX; In A Remarkable Move.

By: David Michael Edwards B.S., M.B.A.

Dave’s Professional LinkedIn Profile can be viewed by Clicking You Left Mouse Button RIGHT HERE.

The Boeing 737 MAX Case Study Analysis Report (Dated August 13, 2019), By David M. Edwards B.S., M.B.A. can be viewed, read, and/or downloaded by Clicking Your Left Mouse Button RIGHT HERE.

The Boeing Company’s Boeing 737 MAX is the latest extension of the historic Boeing 737Baby Boeingproduct line, dating back fifty-five (55) years to 1965 (A.D.), according to The Boeing Company (2020). Ultimately, the Boeing 737 MAX has been grounded for over eighteen (18) months, or over a year and a half, since March 13, 2019, when the United States (U.S.) President Donald J. Trump Ordered the grounding, according to Edwards (2019). The global grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX was in response to two international airline crashes resulting in three-hundred and forty-six (346) human fatalities and no survivors. Both international (i.e. European Aviation Safety Agency [E.A.S.A.], etc.) and United States (U.S.) (i.e. U.S. Federal Aviation Administration [F.A.A.]) federal regulatory organizations have been conducting testing to determine if the Boeing 737 MAX is safe to fly again commercially in these unprecedented scenarios and situations. The Boeing 737 MAX Case Study Analysis Report (Dated August 13, 2019), By David M. Edwards B.S., M.B.A. can be viewed, read, and/or downloaded by Clicking Your Left Mouse Button RIGHT HERE.

Prior to the paralyzing and bankrupting effects of the Corona Virus-19 (COVID19) Disease Pandemic being credibly identified and justly acknowledged (Edwards, 2020), the estimated costs of the Global Grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX were expected to exceed eighteen point seven (18.7) billion United States Dollars (U.S.D.); $18.7 Billion U.S.D., according to Gelles; Isidore; and Rushe (2020). Thus, a credible, recalibrated, and recalculated estimate of the cost of the global grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX taking into account the effects of the COVID19 Disease Pandemic has yet to be determined and/or disseminated.  It does not take imagination, courage, fathoming, fearlessness, heroism, boldness, and/or fantasizing to acknowledge and/or comprehend the accumulated financial costs and financial burdens of the Boeing 737 MAX grounding continues to accumulate astronomically, with no reasonably conceivable end in sight and/or mind. Regardless of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (I.R.S.) tax maneuvers, tactics, strategies, and/or campaigns by The Boeing Company, the airline stakeholders, airlines that have a direct vested role, effect, and stake, of the Boeing 737 MAX may as a whole be losing, or eating, a one (1) billion ($1 Billion) U.S.D. per week loss, mirroring other estimates, according to Ziemelis (2019).

In a Remarkable move, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (F.A.A.) Chief and Director Steven “Steve” Dickson personally flew the latest patched up Boeing 737 MAX from the Captain‘s seat in the cockpit on Wednesday September 30, 2020 for approximately two (2) hours originating from King County International Airport & Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington United States of America (U.S.A.), according to general media outlet reports.

The U.S. F.A.A. has published the below video of the flight conducted by U.S. F.A.A. Director Steve Dickson on the video conduit YouTube.com

Director Dickson graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1979 and a Georgia State University Law School Magna Cum Laude graduate with a Juris Doctorate (J.D.) law degree, according to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (2019). After serving as a U.S. Air Force Boeing F15 pilot and officer, Director Dickson worked as a pilot at the U.S. Delta Airlines attaining the role of Captain in the Airbus A320 with additional flying experience in the Boeing 727, 737, 757, and 767 aircraft. Delta Airlines promoted Captain Dickson to Senior Vice-President of Global Flight Operations with duties including the following: Operational Performance, Pilot Training, Crew Resources Utilization, Crew Scheduling, and Regulator Compliance, according to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (2019). Director Dickson eventually retired from Delta Airlines. Based on his elite education, experience, and service, Director Dickson was both competent and prepared to confidently be sworn in on July 24, 2019 by U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao following U.S. Senate Confirmation (U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, 2019). Director “Dickson is a strong advocate for commercial aviation safety and improvements to our National Airspace System, having served as chairman of several industry stakeholder groups and Federal advisory committees,” according to U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (2019).     

The general media outlets reported Director Dickson met with the U.S. F.A.A. field team directing the oversight of the Boeing 737 MAX recertification for a couple days prior to his flight on September 30, 2020. Director Dickson prepared for the flight by completing the currently purposed pilot ground training and flight training in a high-fidelity level-D (6-degrees of freedom) full-motion flight simulator, according to general media reports.

Director Dickson provided The Boeing Company some reassurance to their efforts for the Boeing 737 MAX recertification stating “I like what I saw on the flight,” following his flight, according to Muntean and Wallace (2020). However, Director Dickson later stated “That doesn’t mean I don’t have some debrief items going forward” and “not so much in the procedures, but in the narrative that describes the procedures” (Muntean & Wallace, 2019). While the additional work for The Boeing Company has apparently yet to be formalized and publicly announced and/or recorded, this latest move indicates that the U.S. F.A.A. recertification of the Boeing 737 MAX is indeed moving forward. Director Dickson has previously declared he will not clear the Boeing 737 MAX to fly unless he feels safe putting his own family on the aircraft to fly.

The Boeing 737 MAX Case Study Analysis Report (Dated August 13, 2019), By David M. Edwards B.S., M.B.A. can be viewed, read, and/or downloaded by Clicking Your Left Mouse Button RIGHT HERE.

REFERENCES:

Edwards, David, M., August 13 (2019). The Boeing 737 MAX Case Study Analysis Report. Sourced from David M. Edwards (www.AeroSpaceWeekly.com): https://aerospaceweekly.files.wordpress.com/2020/10/dme-the-boeing-737-max-case-study-analysis-report-v1.01-final.pdf

Gelles, D. January 29 (2020). Boeing Expects 737 Max Costs Will Surpass $18 Billion. The New York Times. Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/29/business/boeing-737-max-costs.html#:~:text=The%20grounding%20of%20the%20737,drag%20on%20the%20company’s%20results.&text=Boeing%20said%20on%20Wednesday%20that,significant%20increase%20over%20earlier%20forecasts.

Isidore, C. March 10 (2020). The Cost Of Boeing 737 Max Crisis: $18.7 Billion And Counting. Cable News Network (C.N.N.) Business Division. Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/10/business/boeing-737-max-cost/index.html

Muntean P and Wallace, G. September 30 (2020). In unusual move, FAA chief test flies 737 Max; says more fixes needed. Cable News Network (C.N.C.). Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/30/business/faa-chief-boeing-737-test-flight/index.html

Rushe, D. January 29 (2020). Boeing Puts Costs Of 737 Max Crashes At $19bn As It Slumps To Annual Losses. The Guardian. Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/29/boeing-puts-cost-of-737-max-crashes-at-19bn-as-it-slumps-to-annual-loss

The Boeing Company. (2020). 737 Commercial Transport. The Boeing Company. Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.boeing.com/history/products/737-classic.page

U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, August 27 (2019). Steven Dickson.  U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.faa.gov/about/key_officials/dickson/

Ziemelis, G. August 20 (2019). Grounding Boeing 737 MAX May Cost Airlines $1B/Month. Industry Week. Accessed on October 1, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.industryweek.com/technology-and-iiot/article/22028109/grounding-boeing-737-max-may-cost-airlines-1bmonth

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.